News

News

A mobile app proposed by technology architect Colin McFadden and digital preservation specialist Samantha Porter '05 of the University of Minnesota won the 2018 3M Art and Technology Award from the Minneapolis Institute of Art. The two will receive $50,000 toward the development of the project, which is an app that turns the museum into a puzzle room, providing a new, interactive way to deepen visitor engagement with the museum's collection.

The Mn Twins: Bly and Rowan Pope

Opening February 17, the Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia) presents "The Mn Twins: Bly and Rowan Pope"—the first museum exhibition of Minnesota artists and twin brothers Bly and Rowan Pope. Using mostly pencil, both artists create photorealist works of extraordinary detail and psychological depth. Each dedicates hundreds—in some cases thousands— of hours to a single work. On view through October 28, the exhibition features a selection of drawings, paintings, and works in progress.

Although the brothers use the same medium (graphite) and similar photorealist technique, their subjects and approaches are different. Bly concentrates on portraiture and nature. He scrutinizes the ordinary, overlooked, and seemingly banal to show such details of life are worthy of appreciation and artistic expression. Rowan focuses on narrative to examine a range of human emotions, a path that can lead to a chilling view of humanity. In their hyper-vivid depictions, both create haunting, memorable, and at times disturbing works of art.

"The art of Bly and Rowan Pope is a marvel," said Rachel McGarry, PhD, associate curator of prints & drawings at Mia. "It is striking to watch people encounter their work for the first time. The drawings elicit wonder in their hyperrealist technique; it is easy to forget you are looking at something made by a pencil. These are not purely demonstrations of virtuosity, however. Each artist takes on big themes—aging, existence, violence, human nature—to create powerful, memorable works of art."

Exhibition highlights include two works recently acquired by Mia, one from each artist. Bly's monumental portrait Maryanna (2008–11) depicts his grandmother at age 90. His detailed drawing captures her aging face—inspecting her wrinkled flesh, coarse hair, ailing eyes, and composed demeanor—to reveal beauty in an unconventional way. Rowan's A Hunger Artist (2013) is a disturbing image inspired by Franz Kafka's dark story of the same title, which follows a performer, a kind of a circus show, whose act, or art, was to starve himself. The surreal scene shows the performer after a 40-day fast, when a crowd has gathered to see him emerge from his cage a walking skeleton.

Born in 1980 in Southern California, the Pope brothers moved with their family to Minnesota at age 3. Both graduated from Stanford University in California, where they majored in studio art and minored in psychology. They then returned to the Twin Cities and earned MFAs from the University of Minnesota. The brothers have worked side by side yet independently their entire lives.


Parent Presentation: "Foundations of Intercultural Development"

Monday, February 5th6:30pm Lake Country School Gym All are welcome! Need child care during the event? Call 612-827-3707 to sign up (LCS current students only).

Nehrwr (pronounced "nay-wah") Abdul-Wahid is a nationally recognized consultant for his work on authentic community building. He focuses on building capacity to maximize diversity as a necessary resource. Nehrwr's unique ability to effectively use experiential learning to generate authentic dialogue and self-reflection has benefitted clients across the globe.

The primary objectives of the presentation are to:

• Provide shared meaning of key concepts and terms related to cultural competency.

• Increase awareness of one's own cultural influences on their interactions with others.

• Develop tools to aid in gathering information about other cultural groups.


Monday, February 5th6:30pm Lake Country School Gym All are welcome! Need child care during the event? Call 612-827-3707 to sign up (LCS current students only).

Nehrwr (pronounced "nay-wah") Abdul-Wahid is a nationally recognized consultant for his work on authentic community building. He focuses on building capacity to maximize diversity as a necessary resource. Nehrwr's unique ability to effectively use experiential learning to generate authentic dialogue and self-reflection has benefitted clients across the globe.

The primary objectives of the presentation are to:

• Provide shared meaning of key concepts and terms related to cultural competency.

• Increase awareness of one's own cultural influences on their interactions with others.

• Develop tools to aid in gathering information about other cultural groups.




Effective Instruction for Struggling Readers

Tim-Rasinski-Reading-Plus-103.jpg

WORKSHOP FACILITATOR
Tim Rasinski, Ph.D.

In this presentation Dr. Rasinski, director of the award-winning Kent State University reading clinic and a former reading intervention teacher, will present engaging and effective methods for working with students who find learning to read difficult. Dr. Rasinski will focus on and share strategies for dealing with difficulties in the critical areas of word recognition, vocabulary, reading fluency, and comprehension. The strategies presented can easily be implemented in regular classroom and intervention settings.

Earn up to 3 CEU Clock Hour Credits or 3 BOSA Credits.

Don't Forget to Invite Your Friends!

Plymouth, MN

WHEN: March 13, 2018, 7:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

WHERE: Intermediate District 287

1820 Xenium Ln. N., Plymouth, MN, 55441

COST: $25.00*

REGISTER: www.readingplus.com/mnevent

Fargo, ND

WHEN: March 14, 2018, 7:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

WHERE: Holiday Inn Fargo

3803 13th Ave S, Fargo, ND 58103

COST: $25.00*

REGISTER: www.readingplus.com/ndevent

*A cancellation fee of $10.00 will be charged if the registration is canceled after March 1, 2018. Workshop registration is transferable at no charge.

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Attention Visual Arts Teachers

MAIS Affinity Workshop

Visual Arts Connections

Friday Feb. 2, 2018

Saint Paul Academy

8:00am-11:30am

FREE

MAIS Teacher Service Committee is excited to offer this Affinity Day for all teachers of visual arts, preK-12. This will be a morning focused on sharing and learning with and from colleagues.

Schedule of the Day

8:00 – Open Space Discussions

(A light breakfast will be available at this time. Join a table with a discussion focus.)

  • Visual Arts as a part of STEAM education
  • Assessment in the arts - evaluation, measurement, grading, and documentation
  • Art Connections - with colleagues, curriculum, nature, outside resources, businesses, etc.

9:00 – Gallery of Art Connection Ideas

Explore projects featuring a connection with another content area or a community organization.

(Please be thinking of a project/lesson/experience you may be interested in sharing. Sign up for this option will be coming at a later date.)

10:15 – Division Group Discussions

Ask questions, share resources, network, socialize

  • Lower School
  • Middle School
  • Upper School

REGISTER HERE!

Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration 2018

What You Need To Do

Please join us for Friends School of Minnesota's Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration. This annual all-school event explores the Quaker value of community through a variety of songs, dances, and multimedia and spoken word performances.

This year's MLK celebration illustration was drawn by AnnaSophia in 7th grade.

When and Where

  • Friday, January 12 at 7pm
  • O'Shaughnessy Auditorium at St. Catherine University


Elementary Students playing instrument with high school studentby Leah Abbe Bloem, Orchestra Director

Pajamarama is pure joy at its finest! This year's event will be once again combined with the Lower School Admission Preview and held on Thursday, February 1. The evening will begin at 5 PM for prospective families and 5:30 PM for current families.

This Mounds Park Academy original event is a concert created by Upper School orchestra students for Lower School students and their families. The creative endeavor gives Upper School students a chance to entertain and engage with the younger children with unabashed delight. They get to remember what it was like to be a little kid, hearing an orchestra for the first time, in such a welcoming, happy, and fun atmosphere.

Celebrating the MPA Community
We are very fortunate to have pre-kindergarten through high school students all on one campus, which builds a strong sense of community that feels like home. The Upper School orchestra students learn the music and plan a carnival with the understanding that the performance is not about them, but rather what they are giving to, and sharing with, the broader community.

The strong connection between Upper and Lower School students is evident every day at MPA, including at this event. Each student is kind and supportive of one another. At the event, the little ones are encouraged to try games again and again until they win, with cheers from the older students. Even those waiting in line will tell their peers in front of them to try again if they didn't win the first time.

Elementary student playing game with a high school student

Experiencing the Joy of Musical Performance
Pajamarama is important because it gives the Upper School students a chance to look past the technical side of music education and experience the joy of sharing a musical performance. It also provides the opportunity for the orchestra students to really consider who their audience is and create an experience for them. The Upper School students learn about games and music that they may not even know in order to make each and every audience member feel valued and celebrated. They enjoy having the chance to give back to a school and community they love so much.

Creativity at Mounds Park Academy
Pajamarama began as a Disney concert approximately ten years ago. When I started teaching the orchestras four years ago, I decided to add the carnival portion to the night as well as to make the performance more interactive.

In most ensembles, it is common for the director to make the majority of the decisions regarding music and programming. However, for this performance almost all of the games and music have been planned, designed, and carefully developed by the Upper School orchestra students. Consequently, it is a powerful exercise in directing an entire artistic experience that they then perform for the community. The Upper School students both embrace their honed musical and artistic skills and simultaneously return to the delight of their youth through the games and activities with their younger friends.

High school students playing orchestra instrumentsDelighting Kids of All Ages
Students and parents alike love the performance. Upper School parents tell me how much fun it is to watch their child act like a little kid again and jump right into all the games, dancing, and singing. It is a reminder that we are all kids at heart and that we don't have to grow up too fast. Along with the carnival, we also have milk and cookies at the end of the night, while our characters read bedtime stories.

At first glance, one would assume that the Lower School students enjoy the performance the most. However, watching these high-school-age students interact with their younger counterparts always proves that they are just as excited as the grade school students. In rehearsals, the Upper School students are slightly hesitant to sing songs by Raffi and dance to the Hokey Pokey while trying to play their instrument, but once they get a chance to dance and sing with the younger kids, one can see nothing but smiles on all of their faces.

Prospective families should RSVP in advance here! We look forward to welcoming you to Pajamarama!

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Minnehaha Academy Announces Architecture and Construction Firms

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. (December 15, 2017) - Minnehaha Academy is pleased to announce that Minnehaha's Board of Trustees selected Cuningham Group to provide architecture and engineering services and Mortenson Construction as the School's construction manager to build the school's permanent Upper School campus.

"We are confident we have assembled a team that has the capabilities to handle a fast track building project while ensuring a thoughtful and deliberative process, keeping quality at the forefront," said the school's President Dr. Donna Harris.

"Cuningham has a depth of experience in designing educational facilities and provided master planning services for the School in 2013," said Harris. "Cuningham's architects also designed the recent Page Family STEM Lab and science renovation projects at the Upper School. Mortenson partnered with Minnehaha in the build out of the temporary site in Mendota Heights— the company accomplished a near miraculous feat, completing the building in record time. In addition, Cuningham and Mortenson have a strong working relationship and are deeply committed to this project. We remain committed to completing construction in time for the opening of school in the fall of 2019. This is a very aggressive, but achievable, goal."

"We're pleased to partner with Minnehaha Academy as they plan for the future of their Minneapolis campus," said Kendall Griffith, vice president and general manager, Mortenson. "We are inspired by the leadership of the school and look forward to creating the best possible learning environment for students and faculty."

"Cuningham Group is honored to work alongside this team," said Principal Judy Hoskens. "This project is about more than just bricks and mortar, it is about honoring the legacy that Minnehaha holds. It's about creating spaces that are not only representative of the students today, but for all of the future generations of students that will be part of the Minnehaha community. Together we will plan, together we will design, and together we will build."

Demolition will continue on the building at 3100 West River Parkway. Heavier demolition work begins next week, with the tearing down of the 1912 and 1922 buildings. Demolition is estimated to be complete by the end of January 2018.

The school is also working to save artifacts that survived the explosion.